M. FORD CREECH ANTIQUES & FINE ARTS

 

 

SILVER-MOUNTED LEATHER BLACK-JACK

Early 17th Century, Inscribed '1605'

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

The leather small 'jack' of baluster form with an unmarked silver-mounted rim,
the mount with a scalloped and engraved border,
the body and continuous loop handle stitched,
and surrounding a bulbous front tooled 'E.B' '1605',
the underside of the foot inscribed 'I W'

 

"The 'Black-Jack' was a kind of leather pitcher or jug, always lined with pitch on metal,
of massive and sturdy build, corpulent and capacious.
It quite dwarfed all rival pots, mugs, or pitchers of leather."
(See below for more).

 

Condition : Excellent with wear and shrinkage appropriate to age and usage;

leather is in excellent condition for age,

with minor surface abrasions that do not go through to the inside;

the mounts with expected small nicks and scratches

 

4.5" High

 

RESERVED

 

#7842

 

Please Inquire

 

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

Close up detail of leather and date inscription

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

Initials 'E B'

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

 

The 'Black-Jack'

 

The origin of the "black jack" goes back to the Crusades, when waterproof leather bags joined

by the neck, were referred to as "drinking vessels".
The leather, soaked in hot water and then dried, is known as "Jack" leather -
(also the origin of the modern word "jacket").
Jacks were originally black because the black material used to line the inside.
They were referred to simply as "Jacks" the until 1567,
when Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, purchased a "black jack" for one shilling -
the word "black" possibly to distinguish it from the leather jerkin -
a man's sleeveless close fitting jacket, generally made of buff leather.

 

Laws passed by various English monarchs, from Edward II to Elizabeth I,
placed high export tariffs on leather, resulting in a price reduction on the material, and
making it the material of choice for drinking vessels and the transportation of liquids.

 

The leathern vessel retained its high place in both taverns and homes for many centuries.
"Every man of substance took his meals in his hall with his family and servants…. "
When the more luxurious 18th century dining fashions arrived,
"the lord took his meals privately in parlour or dining room,
and the leathern pot remained in the servants' hall -
with the exception of those that were silver mounted.

 

These latter were smaller as a rule and more richly treated;
they were edged with silver and often lined with that metal or with pewter
in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - and were highly prized."

 

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

Later initial IW to base

 

 


 

Also See :

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack inscribed 1605 17th Century Salt-Glazed Westerwald Jug, c1690

 

The Silver-Mounted Blackjack, shown with a Westerwald Salt-Glazed Stoneware Jug, c1690

 

 

 

2021 - NEW & INCOMING CATALOG

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

We welcome and encourage all inquiries regarding our stock.  We will make every attempt to answer any questions you might have.

 

For information, call (901) 761-1163 or (901) 827-4668,

or

Email : mfcreech@bellsouth.net  or  mfordcreech@gmail.com
 
 

American Express, Mastercard, Visa and Discover accepted

 

 

Bookmark and Share

 

 

    

 

M. Ford Creech Antiques & Fine Arts / 581 South Perkins Road /  Memphis, TN 38117 / USA /  Wed.-Sat. 11-6, or by appointment

 


 

 

Accessories     Ceramics    Early Asian Ceramics      Fine Art    Furniture     Glassware     Silver     Home

 

17th Century Silver-Mounted Leather Black-Jack, England, Inscribed '1605' 

 

© The images, concepts and text herein are subject to copyright.

Should you wish to reproduce any part of this site's content, simply request permission.

We also ask that any reproduction be attributed properly.