M. FORD CREECH ANTIQUES & FINE ARTS

 

 

RARE PAIR OF JACOBITE WATER / FINGER BOWLS

England *, c1750-60


Good Pair of Engraved Jacobite Water Bowls, C1750-60

 

Having good weight and grey tone, each deep round bowl of double-ogee shape,
the bodies encircled by finely engraved garlands, including a six-petaled Jacobite heraldic rose,
a sunflower, a carnation, honeysuckle, fruiting vines (possibly loganberries and elderberries),
pears and apples

 

 

Notes :
A pair of wine glasses (Drambuie Collection) having similar borders,

is illustrated in The Jacobites and their Glasses, Geoffrey Seddon, (2015), pl. 33,

with the following notation :
"With a little imagination the initial letters of the flowers can sometimes be made to spell 'Charles'".
(Carnation, Honeysuckle, Apples, Rose, Sunflower)

In Jacobite symbolism, the well known six-petaled rose represented the Stuart Kings,

the carnation "a coronation", the honeysuckle "Fidelity", and the sunflower "unswerving loyalty".

 

Mid-18th century English small glass bowls, either with or without underplates,
are seldom seen. Engraved small bowls are far rarer – much less Jacobite.

It is often related that Jacobite supporters would toast their "King across the water",

passing a Jacobite-engraved wine glass over a bowl of water.

This custom is still sometimes observed at Jacobite celebrations in Scotland –

that is passing a wine glass over an adjacent small bowl of water.
Presumably these small Jacobite glass bowls served such a service,

in addition to "rinsers" for fingers.

(Wine rinsers had at least one pinched spout in which to rest the glass stem).

 

* Jacobite glassware was generally blown and engraved in London by Jacobite sympathizers.

 

Condition : Excellent; without chips or cracks; good striation and wear to the footrim;
a single bubble near the foot

 

4.75" Wide / 10.1 oz, and 11.3 oz.

 

SOLD 

 

#7578

 

Please Inquire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOASTING THE KING ACROSS THE WATER

 

The Jacobite supported attempted to return the Stuarts to the throne in 1689, 1690, 1708, 1715, 1719,
with final disastrous defeat at Culloden in 1745.
For close to a century, Jacobites stubbornly schemed.
Secret societies met and pledged loyalty to the Stuarts.
Plots to overthrow William III, Anne, George I, or George II were brainstormed.
Treasonous toasts were drunk to the King in exile; first to James II, then to his son,
then to his grandson, Bonnie Prince Charlie.
Glasses were raised 'to his Majesty',
and passed above a bowl of water. making this a pledge to 'the King over the water'.

 

Then all leap'd up, and joined their hands
With hearty clasp and greeting,
The brimming cups, outstretched by all,
Over the wide bowl meeting.

"A health," they cried, "to witching eyes
Of Kate, the landlord's daughter!
But don't forget the white, white rose
That grows best over the water."

"But never forget the white, white rose
That grows best over the water."
Then hats flew up and swords sprang out.
And lusty rang the chorus —

"Never," they cried, "while Scots are Scots,
And the broad Frith's before us."

 
'The White Rose Over the Water', 1744

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

SEE ALSO :

 

Rare Geprge II Jacobite Engraved Water Glass, England, c1750

 

Rare George II Jacobite Water Glass

England, c1750

 

 

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M. Ford Creech Antiques & Fine Arts / 581 South Perkins Road /  Memphis, TN 38117 / USA /  Wed.-Sat. 11-6, or by appointment

 


 

 

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Rare Pair George II Jacobite Engraved Water Bowls, England, c1750-60 

 

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