M. FORD CREECH ANTIQUES & FINE ARTS
 

 

Queen Anne Britannia Silver Tot Cup

John Eckfourd (probably, second letter rubbed), London 1707-8

Jacobite Interest

 

 

 

Of heavy gauge silver, the small cup with folded rim and loop handle above a spreading reeded foot,

one side crested :

on a chapeau gules, turned up ermine* a bull's head couped sable spotted argent (Baron Widdrington)

above the mottoes :

Joye sans fin (Joy to the End)

Hoc age (Do this)

*The engraver appears to have omitted the "ermine tails"

 

Baron William Widdrington, 4th Baron of Widdrington (1678-1743)

 

Given the date of manufacture of this tot cup, it was undoubtedly in the possession of a member of the Widdrington family,

chief amongst whom was William Widdrington (born 1678 died 17th April 1743),

the 4th Baron Widdrington and 4th Baronet (of the 1642 creation) and his brothers, Charles and Peregrine.

 

The Widdringtons were an ancient Northumbrian family, who during the Civil War raised

 a considerable force of men to fight for the Royal cause against the Parliamentarians.

The family's fortunes fell into ruins when William, the 4th Baron and his brothers supported the Jacobite

Bonnie Prince Charlie in the Rebellion of 1715 which attempted to restore the House of Stuart

to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland.

William and his brothers were captured and made prisoners after the Battle of Preston in England's north-west,

 and were subsequently tried and convicted of high treason and condemned to death on the 7th July 1716.

Fortunately for William and his brothers, the next year they received a Royal pardon -

 although the family's peerage, baronetcy and estates were forfeited to the Crown.  (See more below).

 

Provenance : Upon Request

 

Note :

Tot cups are small drinking vessels, sometimes with a single handle (as above), or handleless, in beaker form. 

They are usually footed and dram size (about two inches). 

Tot cups are said to be predecessors of the later Georgian 'stirrup cups' -

so popular in both silver and ceramic from the mid-18th century forward. 

Tot cups, like stirrup cups, were likely handed to riders before or after a hunt,

and meant to be drunk without putting the vessel down.

 

Condition : Excellent, with rubbing to the right side of the maker's mark C;

handle possible reattached at upper juncture

 

2-3/8" High / 2.7 oz.
 
SOLD

  

 PRICE : Please Inquire 

 

 #6866

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Widdringtons were an ancient Northumbrian family who during the Civil War raised a considerable force of men

 to fight for the Royal cause against the Parliamentarians.

The family's fortunes fell into ruins when William, the 4th Baron and his brothers supported the Jacobite Bonnie Prince Charlie

in the Rebellion of 1715 which attempted to restore the House of Stuart to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. 

William and his brothers were captured and made prisoners after the Battle of Preston in England's north-west,

and were subsequently tried and convicted of high treason and condemned to death on the 7th July 1716.

 

Fortunately for William and his brothers, the next year they (with others) received a Royal pardon -

owing to the fact that Catherine, William?s second wife was instrumental in getting William and his brothers reprieved.

 However, the family's peerage, baronetcy and estates were forfeited to the Crown under an Act of Attainder.

 

William married firstly Jane (died 1714), daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Tempest, of Stella Hall,

Blaydon-on-Tyne in the County of Northumberland,

and had two sons by Jane (Henry Francis and William Tempest) as well as two daughters, (Alathea and Mary).

 The sons Thomas and Henry left no issue; whilst William's second marriage to Catherine Graham was childless.

After his escape from the executioner, William was allowed to retire to Bath in England's West Country.

On his death in 1743, he was interred in the Graham family vault within the Church of All Saints

at Nunnington in the County of Yorkshire near to Catherine's family estate of Nunnington Hall.

 

 

Portrait of William, 4th Baron Widdrington (1678-1743), by Joseph Highmore

 standing three-quarter-length, in a grey velvet coat, at a casement, a view to a landscape beyond
 

 

Heraldry Courtesy of John Tunesi of Liongam
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

 

 

 

See Also :

 

 

 

William & Mary Silver Tot Cup

Ralph Leeke (Leake), London, c1695

William & Mary Silver Tumbler Cup, London 1692

Queen Anne Britannia Silver Beaker

William Gibson, London, 1702

 

 

 

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M. Ford Creech Antiques & Fine Arts / 581 South Perkins Road /  Memphis, TN 38117 / USA /  Wed.-Sat. 11-6, or by appointment

 

 

 

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Queen Anne Britannia Standard Silver Tot Cup, London 1707, Eckfourd